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nwadvana 27 ( +1 | -1 )
Time Controls in a Tourny Although ive played in schoalistic tounies, which is a minor number, ive never played in an actual rated tourny, or one with standard time controls. What are the standard time controls? The only ones ive played with are 30 and 40 mins.

Thanks in advance
gambitnut 11 ( +1 | -1 )
Most of the tournaments I've played in ... ... have been 40 moves in 90 minutes with 30 or 60 minutes added on for sudden death after 40 moves.
nwadvana 7 ( +1 | -1 )
Cool Wow, thats alot of time :-). Any tips for real tournament play?
More: Chess
gambitnut 98 ( +1 | -1 )
tips Get plenty of sleep.

Know your openings well so you can spend as little time as possible on that phase and have more for the rest of the game. Weather you play "book" openings or not, you should try to know some basic lines that you like to play. Even more important is to know the IDEAS behind your openings. By ideas I mean you should know what you are trying to do in the opening and the common middlegame plans coming out of the opening. If your favorite openings aren't "book" oopenings don't be afraid to play them. Even if the "book" says your side should lose in your opening, what that means is: "If Kasparov were playing Kasparov in this opening, the other side should win." I doubt you are going to be playing Kasparov, he's busy right now!

Practice as much as you can. If possible, try to play some games in the time control of the tournament you are going to so you can get a feel for how much time it really is.
gambitnut 98 ( +1 | -1 )
tips Get plenty of sleep.

Know your openings well so you can spend as little time as possible on that phase and have more for the rest of the game. Weather you play "book" openings or not, you should try to know some basic lines that you like to play. Even more important is to know the IDEAS behind your openings. By ideas I mean you should know what you are trying to do in the opening and the common middlegame plans coming out of the opening. If your favorite openings aren't "book" oopenings don't be afraid to play them. Even if the "book" says your side should lose in your opening, what that means is: "If Kasparov were playing Kasparov in this opening, the other side should win." I doubt you are going to be playing Kasparov, he's busy right now!

Practice as much as you can. If possible, try to play some games in the time control of the tournament you are going to so you can get a feel for how much time it really is.
nwadvana 0 ( +1 | -1 )
:-)
atrifix 0 ( +1 | -1 )
Standard time is 40/2 SD/1.
triangulator 57 ( +1 | -1 )
well the lowest I know of is 45 min, but I fefuse to play in those, I like 1 hr or more, state is 30 moves-80 min, sd-1hr +5sec, somr tips, get plenty of sleep the day before(acually night) I go to bed about 7 or 7:30, then at the tourney be careful make sure you have checked that you aren't makeing any mistakes- eat, drink something, I suggest something like a snak or power bar to munch on during tourneys games( make sure they don't make anynoise) as for drinks, I drink gatorade( no pop!- the stuff doesn't help at all) water is good(probably best), and most of all have fun!
druleeparsec 168 ( +1 | -1 )
The wednesday evening tournaments at the San Diego Chess club are played with a time control of 100 minutes for the first 40 moves, game in 60. So there is a total possible time of 5 hours 20 minutes. Our Saturday "Gambito" tournaments are played at game in 45 minutes with 4 games in one day.

>Know your openings well so you can spend as little time as possible on that phase and have more for the rest of the game. Weather you play "book" openings or not, you should try to know some basic lines that you like to play. <

Actually, there have been quite a few well known authors and chess teachers who have said that class level players shouldn't spend too much time studying the openings. It's far more important to study tactics. For example let's look at this example:

1. d4 d5
2. c4 dxc4
3. e4 e5
4 Nc3 Nf6
5. d5

Black is thinking that he's attacking both center pawns with his knight. If he can pin White's knight then he can win a pawn. So Black plays

5. ... Bb4 ??

Whether you understand the correct move sequence for this opening or not a study of tactics will point out the next move for white

6. Qa4+ ! And White wins a free bishop.

It's easy to take that too far and think that you shouldn't study ANY openings. Studying a book of opening traps is probably good for an under 1800 player because that's essentially just more tactics training. A book like "Logical Chess Move By Move" is also quite good. But a book like MCO or NCO is just overkill for most class players. In general, you'll learn enough opening theory from playing over lots of games.