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ccmcacollister 49 ( +1 | -1 )
Annotating tips & info Today I found this site that discusses various aspects of ANNOTATING CHESS GAMES. And so thought it a timely topic, especially now that GK has added its own Annotated Games feature. Here is the hyperlink to that one .
-> www2.eng.cam.ac.uk

This would be a good place to offer your suggestions on annotating, or discussion of annotators or related matters ...

Favorite annotators ?
ganstaman 69 ( +1 | -1 )
Thanks for the link. I'm about to look through it, so it better be good!

My favorite (or at least one I enjoy) is Nimzo. Even though his ego shows a lot in the annotations, reading them is humorous and still insightful. This has to be one of the better ones (even though it's fake): -> www.chessgames.com
Usually, from what I've seen, he doesn't just give variations, but instead explains what each side is planning, or gives a list of moves that one side should try to achieve (still better than a concrete variation as you can focus on what that player is thinking about).
ionadowman 89 ( +1 | -1 )
Agree with ganstaman's comments about Nimzovitch. ...But I particularly liked Peter Clarke's comments on 'Tal's best games, 1951-1960'. He did received some criticism on 'overannotation' but on the whole I found them a fitting commentary on some amazing games.
Bobby Fischer's '60 Memorable games' features some fine commentaries: there's a story in every game. Larry Evens's brief introductory summaries (a feature also of Soviet practice) add something extra to a very impressive book.
In recent times, I've found Ray Keene to add that extra edge of excitement to his commentary.
I dislike the ostensibly objective notes that seem to suck the life out the game you are playing through. The likes of Fred Reinfeld and Irving Chernev used to append !!! to a Q sac leading to mate in 2, say, which, however hysterical, is much more to my taste than the 'dree as dust oat cakie' school of annotation...
Cheers,
Ion
ironbutterfly 23 ( +1 | -1 )
annotating one's own games If you are a beginner or intermediate annotator of your own games, I highly recommend Dan Heisman's "The Improving Annotator" - he takes you through his own annotations from when he was a beginning chess player to a master -- very solid and thoughtful stuff.